CT Lung Cancer Screening

Mammography and CT Lung Cancer Screening Can Improve Population-Based Health Outcomes

Recent studies support UCSF Radiology's recommendation that annual mammography screening begin at age 40 for women of low or average risk. Mammography can also lead to another health benefit—an opportunity for women to receive lung cancer screening, if eligible.

Preventive Screening Guidelines for Physicians

Preventive imaging exams are designed to detect cancer and noncancerous health conditions in their early stages, when diseases are more treatable and curable. While physicians keep current with preventive care guidelines and recommend and encourage patients to have appropriate screenings, only a small portion of eligible patients receive recommended screenings. 

Lung Cancer Screening Saves Lives; Why Are More Patients Not Screened?

The CT Lung Cancer Screening Program at the UC San Francisco Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging uses radiology tools to detect lung cancer in at-risk patients at its earliest stage. But first you have to get current and former heavy smokers to come in for screening.

Educating on the Value of Lung Cancer Screening

Nearly one hundred sixty thousand people die every year in the U. S. from lung cancer -- a higher number than deaths from breast, prostate, colon, and ovarian cancers combined. But regular screening with low-dose radiation CT scans can catch lung cancer early.

Private Insurance Required to Cover Low-dose CT Screening!

Thanks to recommendations by the U.S. Preventative Task Force, private insurance payors must cover the expense of the lung cancer CT screening by January 2015!

US Preventative Services Task Force Supports Annual CT Scans for Heavy Smokers!

The US Preventative Services Task Force has released new recommendations in favor of annual CT lung cancer screening for long-term smokers. The decision is yet another step forward for screening advocates and the change in policy has the potential to save 20,000 lives each year, experts say.

Women vs. Men: Female Smokers Now Face Increased Lung- Cancer Mortality Risk

When it comes to men versus women, women are now in the lead… But this isn’t a race that either gender wants to win. For the first time, women who smoke are more likely to die of lung cancer than male smokers.

American Cancer Society Joins Ranks of Lung Cancer Screening Supporters!

Lung cancer screening advocates have another major organization on their side. The American Cancer Society published guidelines recommending CT screening for long-term and current smokers.

In What Setting is Lung Cancer Screening Most Effective?

The National Lung Screening Trial (NLST), the largest randomized lung screening trial ever conducted, showed a substantial benefit for heavy smokers aged 55-74 who were screened for lung cancer using low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) scans. CT screening identified more lung cancers at earlier stages resulting in a significant decrease (20 percent ) in lung cancer mortality in the screened group.

Lung Cancer Screening: Excellent for Lung Cancer Detection, Still Questionable for Incidental Malignancies

While the results of the NLST are encouraging for early lung cancer detection, additional unexpected benefits require supplementary research.

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