OSHER Mini Medical School - Cancer Detection and Treatment through Molecular Imanging: "Theranostics at UCSF

Date

October 12, 2017

Type

Progress in Radiology

Time Duration

7:00pm - 8:30pm

Location

Enter at Medical Science Building | 513 Parnassus Ave. | School of Nursing Room: N225

Meet world-renowned experts from the UCSF Department of Radiology & Biomedical Imaging, who are using and developing new and innovative precision imaging tools to enhance diagnosis, improve disease monitoring, and optimize treatment in the individual patient. In close partnership with subspecialty physicians from other UCSF departments, radiologists are now able to use these tools to pinpoint and better treat disorders such as prostate cancer, breast cancer and degenerative spine and joint disease at earlier stages. This series of lectures will explain how emerging technologies – including specific artificial intelligence platforms – will rely upon imaging to dramatically improve accuracy, safety, and outcomes for patients in the very near future.

 

 

Co-Chairs:

 

William P. Dillon, M.D.

Professor and Executive Vice Chair

Department of Radiology & Biomedical Imaging

 

Christopher P. Hess, M.D., Ph.D.

Professor and Associate Chair

Department of Radiology & Biomedical Imaging

Speakers

Thomas Hope, MD
Assistant Professor
Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging
University of California, San Francisco - School of Medicine
Thomas Hope, MD, is an Assistant Professor in Residence in the Abdominal Imaging and Nuclear Medicine sections at UCSF and the San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center. In 2007, he received his medical degree from Stanford University School of Medicine and he completed a one-year internship at Kaiser Permanente, San Francisco. From 2008-2012, Dr. Hope completed a residency in Diagnostic Radiology at the University of California, San Francisco, followed by a clinical fellowship in Body MRI and Nuclear Medicine from Stanford Medical Center in 2013.

Dr. Hope’s main research focus is on novel imaging agents and therapies. He is the principle investigator on the Ga-68 DOTA-TOC IND at UCSF and the Ga-68 PSMA-11 IND at UCSF. He has combined his interest in MR imaging with PET in the simultaneous modality PET/MRI, helping lead the development of the clinical PET/MRI program. Additionally he is developing the PRRT (peptide receptor radionuclide therapy) program for neuroendocrine tumors at UCSF.

Dr. Hope has published 60 peer-reviewed articles, including 21 first author publications.

Expertise:
Abdominal Imaging and Nuclear Medicine

Professional Interests:
Novel imaging agents, PET/MR, prostate cancer, neuroendocrine tumor, targeted radiotherapy

Education and Training:
• Medical School: Stanford University School of Medicine, California
• Internship: Kaiser Permanente, San Francisco, California
• Residency: University of California, San Francisco - Diagnostic Radiology
• Fellowship: Stanford Medical Center, California - Body MRI and Nuclear Medicine
• California Medical License
• American Board of Radiology, Certificate in Diagnostic Radiology
• American Board of Nuclear Medicine, Certificate in Nuclear Medicine
 
Robert Flavell, MD, PhD
Assistant Professor
Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging
University of California, San Francisco - School of Medicine

Robert Flavell, MD, PhD, is an Assistant Professor in the Nuclear Medicine subspecialty in the Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging at the University of California, San Francisco. He received his medical degree from Weill Cornell Medical College, and his PhD from the Rockefeller University as part of the Tri-Institutional MD PhD program. He completed his one-year internship at the Memorial Sloan­Kettering Cancer Center in New York. Dr. Flavell completed a four-year diagnostic radiology residency at the University of California, San Francisco, where he also finished a Nuclear Medicine fellowship. In June 2016. he joined the faculty as an Assistant Professor in Residence.

Dr. Flavell’s laboratory focuses on the development of new molecular imaging tools for better understanding of disease progression in patients with prostate and other cancers. One area of interest is the relationship between acidic interstitial pH and disease progression. Solid tumors are poorly perfused and secrete acids into the adjacent interstitium, resulting in a pH which is mildly acidic, typically ranging from 6.5 – 7.0. This property has been associated with high-grade malignancy, local invasion, and metastasis in animal models. Therefore, it would be desirable to have a method which could be used in patients for monitoring tissue pH. Therefore, one focus of Dr. Flavell’s research is developing methods of imaging acidic interstitial pH with potential for clinical translation. Specifically, two methods are being developed, one of which permits whole body evaluation of areas of acidic pH using positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, and one method which permits quantitative, local determination of interstitial pH based on hyperpolarized 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HP-MRS). The PET method is based on pro-drug glycosylamine derivatives of the commonly used oncologic tracer, [18F]FDG, termed [18F]FDG amines, which are blocked with an acid-labile protecting group. When exposed to the mildly acidic pH present in the interstitium of a solid tumor, the caging group decomposes, liberating native [18F]FDG, which is subsequently absorbed by the adjacent cancer cell (Flavell R.R. et al., Bioconjugate Chem., 2016). The HP-MRS method is based on the administration of a 13C labeled probe which has a predictable change in its chemical shift based on pH. By comparison to a standard curve, quantitative pH measurements can be obtained (Flavell R.R. et al. Chem. Comm. 2015). These techniques are being optimized and ongoing directions include application in animal models, with the long term goal of clinical translation. Other areas of developing interest in the laboratory include techniques for imaging of metals in the microenvironment, and imaging of a metabolic signature associated with immune activation.

Expertise:
Nuclear Medicine

Specialty:
Novel radiotracer development, oncologic imaging, PET imaging, hyperpolarized 13C magnetic resonance imaging

Professional Interests:
Radiology, molecular imaging, PET imaging, prostate cancer, nuclear medicine, radiochemistry, hyperpolarized 13C magnetic resonance imaging

Education and Training:
• Medical School: Weill Cornell Medical College, New York
• PhD: The Rockefeller University, New York
• Internship: Memorial Sloan­-Kettering Cancer Center, New York
• Residency: University of California, San Francisco
• Fellowship: University of California, San Francisco – Nuclear Medicine